Ursus

The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

Lauranne+De+Vos+doing+a+lift%2C+as+the+team+members+holding+her+up+are+treading+water.
Back to Article
Back to Article

The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

Lauranne De Vos doing a lift, as the team members holding her up are treading water.

Lauranne De Vos doing a lift, as the team members holding her up are treading water.

Contributed

Lauranne De Vos doing a lift, as the team members holding her up are treading water.

Contributed

Contributed

Lauranne De Vos doing a lift, as the team members holding her up are treading water.

Samuel Betit, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This article isn’t just about doing laps up and down a pool.

No.

Synchronized swimming, or as some people put it “gymnastics in water,” is an extremely unique physical and artistic sport.

Up to 40 swimmers come together to form a team and perform a routine together in the water in unison.
Synchronized swimming is uncommon in Connecticut; one of these few teams, the New Canaan Y Aquianas, practices three times a week for three to four hours. Their practicing and performing lasts all year long.

Lauranne De Vos, a member of the Aquianas, and someone with tremendous swimming strength, has been doing what she calls “synchro” for about two years now, and she loves it.

Synchronized swimming pushes her to become more determined at what she is doing. If she puts her mind to something, it is hard to change it. Synchro builds your patience and team camaraderie.
“I love synchro because I can do it with my friends,” she said.

Her coach, Liz Hogan, encourages her to keep pushing herself, which is one of the reasons why Lauranne likes her so much. Lauranne says that one of the best parts about going to synchro is “having an awesome coach.”

Coach Liz is also very patient with Lauranne. “I’m hard to be patient with, which is why I like Coach Liz so much,” said Lauranne.

The skills and effort needed to do synchronized swimming are back breaking.
Literally, they are back breaking. In order to do this sport well, being flexible is crucial. For example, sometimes, synchronized swimmers have to do a split underwater, upside down. The ability to move quickly through water requires an incredible amount of strength, particularly leg strength.

Another thing that is vital when doing synchronized swimming is having a large lung capacity because at certain points during the routines, swimmers are underwater for over thirty seconds. Not only that, but they are treading water the whole time. This sport is also performed in the Summer Olympics. Many countries such as Japan, Spain, and Russia have won nearly 150 gold medals combined.

Therefore, if you’re looking for a new activity to do, try synchronized swimming, because you may actually enjoy the thrill of dancing in water.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    R.I.P. Defense

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    An Amazin’ Start and A Bronx Bummer

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Super Ads Amuse Fans

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Eagles Soar Over Patriots

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Students Drawn to Fencing’s Physical, and Mental Demands

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Taking a Knee During Anthem Draws Attention

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Taking Climbing to Another Level

  • Sports

    Mets and Yankees Trade Places

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Is Turf Making Us Sick?

  • The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync

    Sports

    Diving into Westport Water Rats

Navigate Right
Bedford Middle School's Scholastic News Source
The Individual Effort to Swim in Sync